Heat of Neutralization - Copy

Heat of Neutralization - Copy - Heat of Neutralization...

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Plot #2 Plot #1 Results and Observations Plot #3 Plot #4 Plot #5 Plot #6 Plot #7 Plot #8 C 1 V 1 = C 2 V 2 V 2 = (0.5 M phenol)(0.05L phenol) = 0.0125L or 12.5mL 2.0011 M NaOH Heat of Neutralization Introduction
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This laboratory report aims to summarize and discuss the experiment where calorimeters were used to measure temperature changes during a neutralization reaction which ultimately led to the calculation of the heat of the different acid-base reactions. The general aim of the experiment was to perform the neutralization reactions and use the calculations to determine the unknown concentration of a hydrochloric acid solution. When a strong electrolyte is added to a solution, it completely dissociates into its ions (Jacobs & King, 1930). This means that during neutralization H+ and OH- are combining to form water molecules. When reactions occur with weak electrolytes there is only partial dissociation into ions (Velezmoro & Meirelles, 1998). When neutralization occurs, the weak electrolyte would lose its acidic hydrogen and that would be the only dissociation since it does not complete. The heat of reaction, identified by the letter ‘q’, is how much heat is being absorbed or released during a complete chemical reaction. Reactions between strong acid and strong bases produce a heat of neutralization that is the same amount of heat per quantity of reactants used. The enthalpy for this reaction is expected to be -55.90 kJ/mol. The heat of reaction for weak acids and strong bases depends on the acid and base used and whether the weak electrolyte causes an endothermic or exothermic reaction. The heat of neutralization is the heat transferred when one mole of acid reacts with one mole of base (Petrucci, 2007). The coffee cup Styrofoam calorimeter is used to measure the temperature and since the Styrofoam is a good insulator, little heat is transferred between the cup and the surrounding air making is an isolated system (Petrucci, 2007). In order to calculate the heat of reaction from calorimetric data, the quantity of heat equation is needed: q = mc T
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This equation takes into account the mass (m) of the liquid that was used in the experiment which is converted from using the density of 1mL = 1g. The specific heat (c) and the temperature change are needed in order to calculate the quantity of heat. The moles of water formed are then calculated by using the limiting reagent in the respective reaction and the molarity and litres of the substance to isolate the number of moles of that substance. Then to find the moles of water
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Heat of Neutralization - Copy - Heat of Neutralization...

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