11_-_E_=_mc2

11_-_E_=_mc2 - Albert Einstein (1879 1955) E = mc 2 Mass...

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Unformatted text preview: Albert Einstein (1879 1955) E = mc 2 Mass and Energy E = mc 2 Mass and Energy (cont) The science of chemistry was initially developed with the assumption that in chemical reactions, energy and mass are conserved separately. In 1905, Einstein showed that as a consequence of his theory of special relativity, mass can be considered to be another form of energy. Thus, the law of conservation of energy is really the law of conservation of massenergy. In a chemical reaction (a process in which atoms or molecules interact), the amount of mass that is transferred into other forms of energy (or vice versa) is such a tiny fraction of the total mass involved that there is no hope of measuring the mass change with even the best laboratory balances. Mass and energy truly seem to be separately conserved. However, in a nuclear reaction (in which nuclei or fundamental particles interact), the energy released is often about a million times greater than in a chemical reaction, and the change in mass can...
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2009 for the course PHY 3425345 taught by Professor Dr.schrieber during the Spring '08 term at TCNJ.

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11_-_E_=_mc2 - Albert Einstein (1879 1955) E = mc 2 Mass...

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