Lecture10 - Lecture 10 1/30/09 Background reading: Outline:...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 10 1/30/09 Background reading: Outline: Quaternary structure (IV o structure) Hemoglobin Comparison of hemoglobin with myoglobin Conformational changes occur when hemoglobin binds to oxygen. Garrett and Grisham: Chapter 6: Pages 194-201 Chapter 15: Bottom of Page 491- 497 Quaternary structure (IV o structure) Many of the larger globular proteins are oligomeric complexes formed by the association of separate folded polypeptide monomers. These monomers are called subunits . Quaternary structure is a level of protein structure that refers to the manner in which these subunits specifically associate with one another to form the native protein. Depending upon the protein, these structures can be composed of identical or nonidentical protein subunits and can vary in the number of subunits they contain. Examples: Proteins that consist of identical subunits: Homodimers Homotetramers Examples (continued): Proteins that consist of different subunits: Heterodimers Heterotetramers Heterotrimers This association of subunits with one another is usually quite strong with association constants ranging from 10 8 10 10 liters/mole. The same types of bonds involved in forming tertiary structures are used in forming quaternary structures....
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Lecture10 - Lecture 10 1/30/09 Background reading: Outline:...

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