Lecture12 - Lecture 12 2/4/09 Hemoglobin as a blood buffer...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 12 2/4/09 Hemoglobin as a blood buffer Bohr effect Bisphosphoglycerate, an allosteric effector of hemoglobin Protein domains Immunoglobulin G Background reading: Garrett and Grisham: Chapter 15: Pages 500 - 502 Assignment: Segel: Page 93: Problems 53, 54, and 55. Hemoglobin as a blood buffer HHgb + O 2 HHgbO 2 Hgb HgbO 2 + H + + H + + O 2 Ka = 2 x10-8 Ka = 6.3 x10-7 K O 2 = 1 K O 2 = .032 Consider what happens when blood circulates to lungs and then back to the tissues. In last lecture had recognized that hemoglobin undergoes simultaneous equilibria with respect to oxygen and proton dissociation. HHgb + O 2 HHgbO 2 Hgb HgbO 2 + H + + H + + O 2 Ka = 2 x10-8 Ka = 6.3 x10-7 K O 2 = 1 K O 2 = .032 The hemoglobin binds oxygen and the equilibrium shifts to the right. HHgbO 2 is a stronger acid than HHgb and the vertical equilibrium shifts downward resulting in the release of H + . 1 In the lungs: 2 HHgb + O 2 HHgbO 2 Hgb HgbO 2 + H + + H + + O 2 Ka = 2 x10-8 Ka = 6.3 x10-7 K O 2 = 1 K O 2 = .032 H + + HCO 3- H 2 CO 3 H 2 O + CO 2 Still in the lungs:...
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Lecture12 - Lecture 12 2/4/09 Hemoglobin as a blood buffer...

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