Sember_Week_2_present

Sember_Week_2_present - 1 Evolution and History of...

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2 Evolution and History of Disability: Models of Disability in Society Introduction to Disability Studies January 28, 2009 Erin Sember, M.A. ILR School, Employment & Disability Institute
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3 Agenda for Today: Share reactions to the reading Examine different Models of Disability noting historical events that helped shape and/or reinforce the Models Define and discuss Ableism Consider where we are at today in our views of Disability and the impact that social, legal, educational, and professional realms have on those views
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4 Things to Remember During this Lecture: Will use PWD as acronym for People with Disabilities Disabilities are both obvious/seen and hidden/invisible Disabilities can be present from birth or acquired at some point in life Be respectful- hear and talk without judgment Every question and opinion matters!
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5 Reactions to Chapter Two of No Pity Thoughts? Questions? Take Aways?
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6 Disability Throughout History Prior to 1800’s: Moral Model Based on religion PWD tortured, killed, and institutionalized Origin of word “handicap” Primary Sources: Adams, Bell, & Griffin (1997) Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice. New York: Routledge (pp. 219-225). Shapiro (1994) No Pity. New York: Three Rivers Press (Ch. 2).
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7 Disability Throughout History (con’t) 1800’s: Medical Model Based on science Focus on what PWD can not do and what needs to be fixed or corrected in them Segregation and institutionalization sometimes include treatment Eugenics, Social Darwinism, Sterilization Primary Sources: Adams, Bell, & Griffin (1997) Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice. New York: Routledge (pp. 219-225). Burch and Sutherland (2006) “Who’s Not Yet Here? American Disability History”. Radical History Review. Shapiro (1994) No Pity. New York: Three Rivers Press (Ch. 2).
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8 What does this make you think of? Can you think of other examples of how the Medical Model plays out? -From your readings? -From what you’ve seen/experienced? -With other groups/minorities?
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9 Disability Throughout History (con’t) Early to Mid 1900’s: Functional Limitations/Rehabilitation Model Disability viewed as individual matter requiring individual adaptation Returning war veterans prompts focus to shift to rehabilitation Vocational Rehabilitation Act Workers’ Compensation; Sheltered Workshops
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10 Functional Limitations/Rehabilitation Model (con’t) Shift to PWD being admired and praised for
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