L - 12 Manufacturability

L - 12 Manufacturability - Manufacturability ME1800...

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Manufacturability ME1800
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Objectives Introduce manufacturability concepts Design Material selection
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Material selection Considerations Strength Ductility Stiffness Corrosion Density Friction Wear Manufacturability (machinability) Cost
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machinability Materials, specific energy and power Material u o (in-lb/in 3 ) Aluminum alloy 100 000 Gray cast iron 150 000 Free machining brass 150 000 Mild steel (1018) 300 000 Titanium alloys 500 000 Stainless steel 700 000 1 in-lb/in 3 = 7020 J/m 3
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Consider strength (yielding or fracture) 6061 T6 Aluminum alloy 35 ksi yield tension and compression shear 20ksi 1018 Mild steel 45ksi Titanium 34ksi Brass 53ksi Delrin ® DuPont acetal copolymer 90°C, 7-8.5ksi tensile strength 1ksi=1000ps i
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Consider stiffness (deflection) Aluminum alloys about 10,000ksi Steel alloys about 30,000ksi Brass about 16,000ksi (Cu-Zn alloy stiffness varies with composition) Titanium about 17,000ksi Delrin ® 900ksi (can be a polymer blend – properties vary with composition)
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Consider corrosion Avoid contact between different kind of metals in wet environments consider Aluminum Brass Polymers Stainless steel (does corrode) Titanium Coatings (electroless nickel)
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Usually based on hardness – the harder the more wear resistant Hardness depends on composition and mechanical and thermal treatments Lower friction can improve wear life (not a good strategy for some applications like tires) Hard materials often must be ground, rather than machined Often machine in the soft state, harden by heat treatment maybe with carbon or nitrogen, then grind
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course ME 1800 taught by Professor Brown during the Winter '08 term at WPI.

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L - 12 Manufacturability - Manufacturability ME1800...

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