Luria Delbruck Handout(from class)

Luria Delbruck Handout(from class) - MUTATIONS OF BACTERIA...

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E S P Electronic Scholarly Publishing http://www.esp.org M UTATIONS OF B ACTERIA FROM V IRUS S ENSITIVITY TO V R ESISTANCE S. E. LURIA AND M. DELBRÜCK Luria, S. E., and M. Delbrück, 1943. Mutations of bacteria from virus sensitivity to virus resistance. Genetics, 28: 491–511.
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New material in this electronic edition is © 2001, Electronic Scholarly Publishing Project http://www.esp.org The original work, upon which this electronic edition is based, is © 1943, Genetics Society of America and is reprinted here with permission. This electronic edition may be used for educational or scholarly purposes, provided that these copyright notices are included. The manuscript may not be reprinted or redistributed, in any form (printed or electronic), for commercial purposes without written permission from the copyright holders. Electronic Scholarly Publishing Project Foundations Series: Classical Genetics Series Editor: Robert J. Robbins The ESP Foundations of Classical Genetics project has received support from the ELSI component of the United States Department of Energy Human Genome Project. ESP also welcomes help from volunteers and collaborators, who recommend works for publication, provide access to original materials, and assist with technical and production work. If you are interested in volunteering, or are otherwise interested in the project, contact the series editor: rrobbins@fhcrc.org. Bibliographical Note This ESP publication is a newly typeset, unabridged version, based on the original 1943 paper published by the Genetics Society of America in the journal Genetics . All footnotes are as they appeared in the original work. Figures 1 and 2 have been redrawn for this digital version. Production Credits Scanning of originals: John B. Ferguson, Bard College OCRing of originals: John B. Ferguson, Bard College Typesetting: ESP staff Proofreading/Copyediting: John B. Ferguson, Bard College Graphics work: ESP staff Copyfitting/Final production: ESP staff
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iii INTRODUCTION acteria have been the subject of intensive investigation ever since they were recognized as causative agents in disease. Despite this scrutiny, for several reasons bacteria were regarded as unsuitable for genetic research. First, bacterial reproduction seemed to be totally asexual and thus could not be analyzed with standard genetic methods. Second, because no bacterial chromosomes could be detected under the light microscope and because nothing akin to the mitotic or meiotic segregation of chromosomes could ever be observed, many bacteriologists felt that bacteria simply could not possess genes similar to those of higher organisms. (Some even performed mathematical calculations to “prove” that the invisibly small bacterial “nucleus” was not big enough to hold genes.) Finally, bacteria exhibited patterns of inheritance that seemed to be fundamentally different from those of higher organisms. In particular, bacteria appeared to transmit acquired characteristics to their progeny.
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Luria Delbruck Handout(from class) - MUTATIONS OF BACTERIA...

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