Animal Testing - Animal Experimentation Running head Animal Experimentation 1 Animal Experimentation The Hidden Side-Effects Kristen Paxson Drexel

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Animal Experimentation 1 Running head: Animal Experimentation Animal Experimentation: The Hidden Side-Effects Kristen Paxson Drexel University 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
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Animal Experimentation: The Hidden Side Effects "A rat is a pig is a dog is a boy" (Newkirk, 2004, para.5). Perhaps what the president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) meant was that we are all so alike, yet so different. Animals play an important part in human life, serving us with their companionship. When we are alone or sick or when we are enthusiastic about our health and fitness, animals are there to comfort us. Recently though, they serve as models for developing drugs and procedures in human medicine. This instance now questions the justification that supposedly helps us. The most controversial ethical topic within animals, experimentation continues decade after decade, despite heavy doubt and opposition. For many centuries, animals have served as property in which they have become accessible tools for benefits of humanity. People believed they lacked souls and did not need the same attention. Also with the prominence of religion, the bible is influential to “make man [. ..] have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, [. ..] and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth" (as cited in Hile, 2004, p.19). No wonder this reasoning was justified for inhumane use of animals. The assumption that only humans had the capacity to reason and execute moral claims was common as well. Furthermore, humans were apparently the only ones that could suffer pain, and animals could not. If true, how can we rely on nonhumans if they are that much cognitively different from us? There is no doubt that animals are not fit to change their own behavior or fully understand rules, but human beings are. Certainly, we are able to choose between harmful and non-harmful behavior, and recognize pain in others. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
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In this past decade, society has really begun to fight for animals' right to withhold involuntary measures. Since the food chain starts with humans, many believe, it gives them the right to survival, over any other organism. Lately animal rights activists have begged to differ. A new era of issues and debates amongst this horrifying research method has brought lack of trust for new findings in human medicine. Animals should be entitled the same humane treatment and justice as humans. Today they still have little to no protection, but certainly not due to lack of effort. The Laboratory Animal Welfare Act for instance helps protect their mental and physical health, by providing adequate living conditions (as cited in People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals [PETA], 2006). However, many clinics and laboratories do not follow these arrangements, giving rise to the
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course ADVANCED E HSCI 310 taught by Professor Perry during the Spring '08 term at Drexel.

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Animal Testing - Animal Experimentation Running head Animal Experimentation 1 Animal Experimentation The Hidden Side-Effects Kristen Paxson Drexel

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