Hoyoung Oh.doc 1 - Hoyoung Oh Fab 333 Dr. A. Mccool...

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Hoyoung Oh Fab 333 Dr. A. Mccool February 29, 2008 1. Eating choices are typically made according to what is obtainable, what is acceptable, and what is preferred: a dietary domain determined by availability and by what each person consider edible or inedible. An individual’s dietary domain is established before he or she sets foot in a restaurant, or supermarket. Food selection is primary motivated by taste. Taste is defined broadly the sensory properties detectable in foods: color, aroma, flavor, and texture. Humans anticipate a specific food will have certain sensory characteristic; deviations can signal that the item is poisonous or spoiled. Cost is often the second most important influence in food choice, and income level is the most significant sociodemographic factor in predicting selection. In cultures with a limited food supply due to environmental conditions or in societies where a large segment of the population is disadvantaged, food price is more imperative that taste, dictating nutritional sufficiency and well-being. The wealthier the society, the less disposable income is spent on food, and, as income increases food choices change.
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Convenience is a major concern in food purchase, particularly by members of urbanized societies. In some cultures everyone’s job is near home, and the whole family joins in a leisurely midday lunch. in urbanized societies people often work far from home; therefore, lunch is eaten with fellow employees. Instead of a large, home cooked meal, employees may eat a quick fast food meal. Furthermore, family structure can necessitate convenience. Self-expression, the way in which we indicate who we are by behavior or activities, is important for some individuals in food selection, particularly as a marker of cultural identity. Although the foods associated with ethnicity, religious affiliation, or regional association is predetermined through the dietary domain, it is worth noting that every time a person makes a food choice he or she may choose to follow or ignore convention. Self-identity can be another factor in food selection. An environmentalist may be a vegetarian who prefers organic, locally grown produce, while a gourmet or “foodie” may patronize small markets in ethnic neighborhoods throughout a city searching for unusual ingredients. Physical and spiritual well-being is another food choice consideration for some individuals. Physiological characteristics, including age, gender, body image, and state
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of health, often impact food habits. 2. The context in verbal communication varies culturally. The termed low-context style is the actual words are more important than who is receiving the message, how words said, or the nonverbal actions that accompany them. Communication in low-context culture is so dependent on words that the underlying meaning is indecipherable if wording is chosen poorly or deliberately to mislead the recipient. The Swiss, Germans, and Scandinavians are considered examples of low-context cultures. In cultures with a
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course FAB 333 taught by Professor Audreymccool during the Spring '08 term at University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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Hoyoung Oh.doc 1 - Hoyoung Oh Fab 333 Dr. A. Mccool...

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