Energy and Cellular Metabolism

Energy and Cellular Metabolism - Energy and Cellular...

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  Human Physiology Spring '09 1 Energy and Cellular  Energy and Cellular  Metabolism Metabolism Chapter 4 Chapter 4
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  Human Physiology Spring '09 2 Properties of Living Organisms Have highly organized, complex structure Acquire, transform, store, and use energy Sense and respond to internal and external environments Maintain homeostasis through internal control systems with feedback Store, use and transmit information Reproduce, develop, grow and die Have emergent properties that cannot be predicted from the simple sum of the parts Species evolve
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  Human Physiology Spring '09 3 Properties Living organisms are highly organized and complex entities. Even a one-celled bacterium, although it appears simple under a microscope, has incredible complexity at the  chemical level of organization. It uses intricately interconnected biochemical actions to acquire, transform, store, and use energy and information. It senses and responds to changes in its internal and external environments so that it can maintain homeostasis.  It reproduces, develops, grows, and dies, and over time, its species evolves.
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  Human Physiology Spring '09 4 Energy is Essential Energy is essential for these processes we associate with living things. Without energy for growth, repair, and maintenance of the internal environment, a cell is like a ghost town filled  with buildings that are slowly crumbling into ruin.  Cells need energy to import raw materials, make new molecules, and repair or recycle aging parts. The ability of cells to extract energy from the external environment and use that energy to maintain themselves as  organized, functioning units is one of their most outstanding characteristics.
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  Human Physiology Spring '09 5 Energy is Used to Perform Work All living organisms obtain, store, and use energy to fuel their activities.  Energy  can be defined as the capacity to do work. In biological systems the word work can mean one of three specific things Chemical work Transport work Mechanical work
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  Human Physiology Spring '09 6 Chemical Work Chemical work : the making and breaking of chemical bonds, enables cells and organisms to grow, maintain a suitable  internal environment, and store information needed for reproduction and other activities.  Forming the chemical bonds of a protein the body will use for wound repair is an example of chemical work.
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2009 for the course PGY 300 taught by Professor Krasney during the Spring '05 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Energy and Cellular Metabolism - Energy and Cellular...

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