Week 5 Mongols

Week 5 Mongols - Mongol Invasion of Russia 1223: Battle of...

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Decline of Kiev
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Decline of Kiev “Defeat” of Kiev in 1169; prominence of Vladimir-Suzdal Civil War Mongol Invasion
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Alexander Nevsky
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Alexander Nevsky (1252-1263) A contracted prince of Novgorod Defended Russia in three major assaults: against the Swedes (1240), Teutonic Knights (1242), and Mongols (1247) 1242 famous “massacre on the ice” against Teutonic Knights Made Grand Prince of Russia, 1252-1263
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The Mongols
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Who Were the Mongols? Nomadic, dependent on trade Military expansion Unification by Genghis Khan Conquests
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The Mongol Invasion
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Mongol Warriors Outstanding horsemen, highly skilled with bow and arrow; also acquired new technology with each culture they conquered Cavalry force was highly trained, easily mobilized, and consisted of entire adult male population Four qualities leading to their success: surprise, mobility, organization, and discipline
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Chingis Khan (1165-1227) 1165: Born Temuchin 1206: received title Genghis Khan 1211-1214: conquest of China 1219: conquest of Persia 1227: dies; succeeded by Ogadai
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Unformatted text preview: Mongol Invasion of Russia 1223: Battle of the River Kalka 1236: Return of Batu Khan to Russia 1237: Destruction of Riazan 1238: Destruction of Moscow and Vladimir 1239: Destruction of Pereiaslavl and Chernigov 1240: Destruction of Kiev 1241-42: Defeat of Hungary and Poland; sudden retreat Mongol forces The Mongol Yoke 1237-1480 Impact of Mongol Yoke Initial physical destruction Weakening of productive capacity Expropriation of surplus Taxation (tribute): initially 10% of everything (livestock, valuables, women, children); eventually a monetary tax Further Effects Isolation from the West; little interaction or contact Not really much effect politically Taxation and postal system ROC left untouched, even tax-exempt Psychological: xenophobia Decline of Mongol Power Weakening of Mongol Rule Internal dissension and power struggles No strong political structure Continued and growing resistance from Russians...
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Week 5 Mongols - Mongol Invasion of Russia 1223: Battle of...

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