Experiment1

Experiment1 - Experiment #1 Using the laboratory...

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Experiment #1 Using the laboratory instruments and software 1 Objective Learn to use the laboratory instruments and software that will be needed for the experiments. Refer to the notes of lecture #1 and to the “Instruction Manual” at the 2CL WEB site for additional description of the equipment and components. 2 Homework 1. Read through the “Course Structure” page on the course WEB site. 2. Study the “Instruction Manual” so that you are familiar with the controls on the three instruments and with the set up of the proto-board. 3. Read these instructions for experiment 1 so that you can follow them rapidly when working in the lab. 4. Review the mean and standard deviation and the probability table for the normal distribution function. 5. Review series and parallel combinations of resistors. For this lab, you will be graded by the TA’s on your performance in the lab. This will be based upon your understanding of these instruments. 3 Description of the instruments 3.1 The multimeter The multimeter that you will use can measure DC voltage, AC voltage, DC current, AC current, resistance ( ), capacitance ( ), and frequency (Hz). The display indicates the measurement setting. For all measurement other than high current measurements the leads will be plugged into the COM and V connectors. 1
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The multimeter can be used to measure voltages, currents, frequency (of an AC signal), resistance, and capacitance aswell as to test the . For voltages and currents it can measure both DC and AC. In the latter case it measures the Root Mean Square value (rms). In each function setting the scale is set automatically by the value you are measuring. The scale is shown in the LCD display as for example mV (milli-Volts), V (volts), pF (picoFarads, μ F (microfarads), etc. The multimeter has 3 input terminals. The black one is labeled “com” (for “common”) and serves as the circuit’s ground or common terminal. The meter will automatically sense the polarity of DC voltages or currents so that either wire may be connected to either input terminal. The sign will be indicated on the display. The terminal labeled “V ” is the other input for all measurements other than large currents. The terminal labeled “A” is used only for measuring currents greater than 1 A. 3.2 The pin board (“proto-board”) The pin board is a device that provides simple and rapid connection of circuits. Wires connected to circuit elements as well as pieces of wire to make connections can be 2 Figure 1. Pin board with power supply connections to a 356 op-amp. The red lines indicate pin holes that are electrically connected.
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pushed into the holes where they make electrical contact to spring clips. The clips inside of the holes are connected as indicated in Figure 1. The stand up connector at the middle of the right end connects to the power supply that provides the +5, +12, -12, and GRND for the circuits assembled on the board. The pins at the right hand end of the board
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2009 for the course PHYS 2CL taught by Professor Bodde during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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Experiment1 - Experiment #1 Using the laboratory...

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