CHAPTER 3 - CHAPTER 3: CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS OF EMOTIONS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 3: CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS OF EMOTIONS I. THE CONSTRUCTION OF EMOTIONS IN THE WEST: a. The stances toward emotion, distrust on the one hand and  appreciation on the other, are constructions of Western culture. The  appreciation became marked in Europe and America, during the  historical era of Romanticism.  b. Jean-Jacques Rousseau proposed that education should be natural  and that people’s natural emotions indicate what is right – they  have merely to be alive to the feelings of their conscience.  c. Themes of Romanticism: settings amid wild scenery, the emphasis  on the natural, distrust of the artificial, apprehension of humans  arrogantly overstepping their boundaries. II. THE ELEMENTS OF A CULTURAL APPROACH TO EMOTION a. A cultural approach involves the assumption that emotions are  constructed primarily by the processes of culture. Aspects ranging  from how emotions are valued to how they are elicited are shaped  by culture-specific beliefs and practices, which in turn have been  affected by historical and economic forces b. More radical claim: emotions derive from human meanings which  are necessarily cultural, interest in emotions across cultures is an  interest in their differences c. Emotions can be thought of as roles that people fulfill to play out  culture-specific identities and relationships d. Batja Mesquita contends that cultural approaches focus on the  “practice” of emotion, in contrast to the “potential” for emotion e. The self-construal approach: independent and interdependent  selves i. Independent: self is autonomous and separate from others,  referred to as individualism. Imperative is to assert one’s  distinctiveness and independence, and to define the self  according to unique traits and preferences. Focus is on  internal causes, which are stable across contexts ii. Interdependent: self connected with other people. Imperative  is to find one’s status, identity, and roles within the  community, emphasis is on social context and situational 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
influences. Oneself is embedded within social relationships,  roles, and duties, with a self that is ever-changing, shaped  by different contexts iii. Massachusetts: incidents of anger occurred about once a  week, most concerned someone the participant liked, most  participants said the reason for anger was to assert authority  or independence, or improve their image iv. American and Japanese infants were no different in how  soon they moved after the sound of their mothers’  joyful/fearful voices. American infants moved toward the toy  an average of 18 seconds after hearing angry voice,  Japanese babies took 48 seconds
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 6

CHAPTER 3 - CHAPTER 3: CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS OF EMOTIONS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online