CHAPTER 6 - CHAPTER 6 EMOTIONS AND THE BRAIN I HOW DO BRAIN...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 6: EMOTIONS AND THE BRAIN I. HOW DO BRAIN MECHANISMS OF EMOTION WORK? a. Neuroimaging: a machine monitors biochemical events in a series  of conceptual slices through a person’s brain, while a computer  takes this information and constructs visual images of the brain to  show which regions have been metabolically most active, non- invasive,  PET, fMRI b. Emotional effects of accidental damage to the brain, deliberate  lesions in the brains of animals, stimulation of parts of the brain  electrically, use of pharmacologically active substances that affect  the chemical mechanisms of neurons c. Hindbrain includes regions that control basic physiological  processes:  medullai  regulates cardiovascular activity, the  pons  controls human sleep, the  cerebellum  is involved in controlling  motor movement d. Forebrain:  thalamus : integrating sensory information, the  hippocampus : critical for memory processes, and the  hypothalamus : regulates important biological functions like eating,  sexual behavior, aggression, and bodily temperature. The forebrain  also includes the  limbic system  – with structures involved in  emotions like the  amygdala  – and the  cortex  is closely associated  with the ability to lead complex social lives.  Frontal lobes  are  involved in planning and intentional action, and emotional  regulation e. Early research on brain lesions and stimulation: i. Cannon: cats deprived of their cortex were liable to make  sudden, inappropriate, and ill-directed attacks (sham rage),  proposed that the cortex usually inhibits this expression of  rage ii. Hess and Brugger: complemented the research on lesions  with experiments using electrical stimulation that elicited  angry behavior not from the thalamus but from the  hypothalamus lying just below it iii. Hughlings-Jackson: lower levels of the brain are reflex  pathways related to simple functions like posture and 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
movement. At the next level are more recently evolved  structures, including emotions. At the highest evolved level,  the cortex controls all levels below it  iv. Brain trauma leads to the diminished activity of the higher  regions of the brain, thus releasing the lower ones from  inhibition f. The limbic system: i. Papez argued that sensory impulses from the body and  outside world reach the thalamus and split into three main  pathways. One goes into the  striatal region , the stream of  movement. One goes to the  neocortex , the stream of  thought. One goes to the  limbic system  with its many  connections to the hypothalamus, the stream of feeling.  ii. MacLean: the human forebrain includes three distinct 
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 6

CHAPTER 6 - CHAPTER 6 EMOTIONS AND THE BRAIN I HOW DO BRAIN...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online