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Donne Paper - Evans 1 Tyler Evans Mrs Albritton Eng261 11...

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Evans 1 Tyler Evans Mrs. Albritton Eng261 11 November 2006 Donne: A Comparison of Poetic Works John Donne, a poet known for his obsession with death and his captivating sermons during a ten year service to st. Paul’s Cathedral, also wrote several poems associated with love. More often than not, these poems deal with nature and its ability to subdue love. John Donne, in “The Sun Rising” and “Break of Day,” analyzes the sun’s ability to interfere with love. To better understand John Donne’s poems involving nature and love, it is imperative that one takes a look into Donne’s past, especially young adulthood. At the age of 11 he entered the University of Oxford, where he studied for three years. According to some accounts, he spent the next three years at the University of Cambridge but took no degree at either university. After a brief study of law he was appointed private secretary to Sir Thomas Egerton, Keeper of the Great Seal, in 1598. A secret marriage to Egerton’s niece, Anne More, in 1601, led to Donne’s dismissal from his job and a short imprisonment. “A comment made at the time, sometimes attributed to Donne himself, was, ‘John Donne, Anne Donne, Undone.’”(Miller 826) One may take this more than one way, but it seems that an event of this nature would propel John Donne into writing poems about someone or something deterring love.
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Evans 2 “The Sun Rising” and “Break of Day” have several likenesses and differences. For instance, both poems have the same even number of lines in each stanza, but in contrast, “The Sun Rising” has 10 lines in each of its three stanzas, whereas “Break of Day” has only six for its three stanzas. Also, “Break of Day” uses iambic tetrameter as a rhyming scheme and “The Sun Rising” uses it but seldom. “"Tetrameter" means "four measures." Verse written in tetrameter has four measures, which are also called feet. In English, the most common foot or measure is the iamb, which is a pair of syllables that follow this pattern: ta TUM. Iambic tetrameter has four such feet, for a total of eight syllables.”(Tetrameter.com) Below is the first stanza of “Break of Day” with emphasis on every second syllable in each line as is the rule for iambic tetrameter: ‘Tis TRUE, ‘tis DAY: what THOUGH it BE?
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