BB lecture 2-4-09, population genetics

BB lecture 2-4-09, population genetics - Chapter 23...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 23 (pp.468-484) Population Genetics Learning objectives Be able to discuss what contributes to a populations genetic variation, and what factors lead to changes in the frequency of alleles or genotypes in a population. Learn how to use the Hardy-Weinberg equation to predict genotype frequencies in a population. List the five conditions that must be met for a population to remain in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Explain why mutation has little quantitative effect on allele frequencies in a large population. Terms to know includegene flow, genetic drift, bottleneck effect, founder effect, population, gene pool, geographic variation, cline, microevolution Four important terms and their definitions: 1. A population is a localized group of individuals that are capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring 2. A gene pool is the total aggregate of genes in a population at any one time 3. Population genetics is the study of how populations change genetically over time 4. Microevolution is change in the genetic makeup of a population from generation to generation meiosis and fertilization alone will not alter the frequency of alleles or genotypes in a population Preservation of Allele Frequencies Fig. 23-7-1 Sperm C R C W C W C R C W C W C W C R C R C R C R C W E g g s In a population where gametes contribute to the next generation randomly , allele frequencies will not change because Mendelian inheritance preserves genetic variation within a stable population Variation Between Populations Most species exhibit geographic variation , differences between gene pools of - separate populations , or - population subgroups Fig. 23-4 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 46 44 42 40 38 36 34 32 30 Georgia Warm (21C) Latitude (N) Maine Cold (6C) Ldh-B b allele frequency Some examples of geographic variation occur as a cline , which is a graded change in a trait along a geographic axis The Evolution of Populations...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/26/2009 for the course BIO 311D taught by Professor Reichler during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 27

BB lecture 2-4-09, population genetics - Chapter 23...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online