Oedipus - Oedipus Oedipus is a man of swift action and...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Oedipus Oedipus is a man of swift action and great insight. At the opening of Oedipus the King, we see that these qualities make him an excellent ruler who anticipates his subjects’ needs. When the citizens of Thebes beg him to do something about the plague, for example, Oedipus is one step ahead of them—he has already sent Creon to the oracle at Delphi for advice. But later, we see that Oedipus’s habit of acting swiftly has a dangerous side. When he tells the story of killing the band of travelers who attempted to shove him off the three-way crossroads , Oedipus shows that he has the capacity to behave rashly. At the beginning of Oedipus the King, Oedipus is hugely confident, and with good reason. He has saved Thebes from the curse of the Sphinx and become king virtually overnight. He proclaims his name proudly as though it were itself a healing charm: “Here I am myself— / you all know me, the world knows my fame: / I am Oedipus” (7–9). By the end of this tragedy, however, Oedipus’s name will have become a curse, so much so
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course ENGL 261 taught by Professor Albritton during the Spring '07 term at Jefferson Davis Community College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online