L02_Units_Dimensions_Public

L02_Units_Dimensions_Public - ES140 Section 7 INTRODUCTION...

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ES140 Section 7 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING L02: Units and Dimensions
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Engineering is… Problem solving The application of scientific knowledge to solve practical problems Creating, designing, testing, and improving systems and products Applying math and science to life All of the above
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Group Brainstorming What are the perceived rewards of an engineering job?
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Group Brainstorming How can engineers help to solve some of the world’s top problems? Energy Disease (AIDS, Cancer, Avian Flu, etc.) Clean Water The Environment World Hunger Terrorism
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A physical quantity must be represented by both a numerical value and a unit . If either of these is not present, then the information is not useful. Dimensions describe physical values, e.g. ‘length’ is a dimension. A unit describes the measure of dimension , e.g. ‘meter’ is a unit.
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The two most common unit systems are: SI Units (Systeme International d'Unites)—a decimal, absolute system based on the meter, kilogram, and second as the units of length, mass, and time, respectively British or Engineering Units —traditional US system based on foot, lbm, and second as the units of length, mass, and time, respectively
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Fundamental or Base dimension—dimension that can be conveniently and usefully manipulated when expressing all physical quantities of a particular field of science or engineering. There are 7 base dimensions: length [L] electric current [I] mass [M] amount of substance [n] time [t] luminous intensity [i] temperature [T] Derived dimensions—a combination of fundamental dimensions, e.g. velocity (length/time), i.e. [L/t]
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Table 1. SI Fundamental or Base Units A similar table for British Units is provided in your textbook.
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UNITS (cont’d) A similar table for British Units is provided in your textbook *The thermodynamic temperature (TK) expressed in kelvins is related to Celsius temperature (Tc) expressed in degrees Celsius by Tc=TK-273.15.
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L02_Units_Dimensions_Public - ES140 Section 7 INTRODUCTION...

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