Chapter 1 - CHAPTER 1 An Introduction to Life On What is...

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CHAPTER 1: An Introduction to Life On Earth
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What is Biology? --- The science of living organisms and life processes.
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O.K., so what is science? And If biology is the science of “life,” what exactly is life ?
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the quality that distinguishes a vital and functioning being from a dead body” Certain characteristics define LIFE
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The characteristics of life : 1. Complex, organized structure 2. Response to stimuli - a change outside (or inside) leads to another change 3. Homeostasis - the ability to maintain the structure and regulate the internal environment. 4. Ability to acquire material and energy -The material and energy are often transformed 5. Growth 6. Reproduction - either sexual or asexual DNA is genetic information, the “blueprint” for the offspring 7. Ability to evolve - to change to fit the environment
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Living Things Are Both Complex and Organized Salt: Organized but simple (non-living)
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Living Things Are Both Complex and Organized Oceans: Complex but unorganized (non-living)
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Living Things Are Both Organized and Complex Water flea: Complex and organized (living)
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Each level of complexity or structure is based on the one below it Levels of biological organization, in order of least to most complex illustrated in Fig. 1-2 Living Things Are Both Organized and Complex
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Least complex Most complex 0 Biosphere Ecosystem Community Multicellular Organism Organ System Organ Tissue Cell Organelle Molecule Subatomic Particle Atom That part of Earth inhabited by living organisms; includes both the living and nonliving components A structure usually composed of several tissue types that form a functional unit A community together with its nonliving surroundings Two or more populations of different species living and interacting in the same area An individual living thing composed of many cells Two or more organs working together in the execution of a specific bodily function A group of similar cells that perform a specific function The smallest unit of life A structure within a cell that performs a specific function A combination of atoms The smallest particle of an element that retains the properties of that element Particles that make up an atom carbon nitrogen oxygen hydrogen proton neutron electron DNA glucose water mitochondrion nucleus chloroplast nerve cell nervous tissue the brain the nervous system Earth's surface snake, antelope, hawk, bushes, grass, rocks, stream snake, antelope, hawk, bushes, grass herd of pronghorn antelope pronghorn antelope Population Members of one species inhabiting the same area Species Very similar, potentially interbreeding organisms LEVELS OF BIOLOGICAL ORGANIZATION
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O H H CH 2 OH Subatomic Subatomic Electron Electron Neutron Neutron Proton Proton Nitrogen Nitrogen Carbon Carbon Hydrogen Hydrogen Oxygen Oxygen DNA DNA Glucose Glucose Water Water Nucleus Nucleus Chloroplast Chloroplast Mitochondrion Mitochondrion Nerve Cell Atomic Atomic Molecular Molecular Organelle
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