LED Light Lab

LED Light Lab - Emilia Wilson November 14, 2008 Chemistry A...

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Emilia Wilson November 14, 2008 Chemistry A LED Light Lab Part 1 : Question : What is the relationship between energy and wavelengths? Hypothesis : The more energy there is, the shorter the wavelengths. With the increase in frequency, the wavelengths vary inversely and become shorter. This hypothesis will be held true when 5 out of the 6 data points follow this trend. Variables : Independent Variables : The independent variables for this lab were the different colors of the LED lights because the wavelength and voltage required vary from one LED light bulb to another. The difference between a red LED and a blue LED is based on the color which affects the wavelength and the voltage required to power it. Dependent Variables : The dependent variables were the wavelengths and the voltage required to power the LED bulbs. These variables are dependent upon the color of the LED because blue, red, green, UV, yellow and orange bulbs all require different amounts of energy to light them up. Control : The control of this experiment was a circuit with no power supply and a bulb attached because this shows that without any voltage there aren’t any wavelengths. Controlled Variables : The controlled variables include the temperature of the
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classroom and equipment, the light in the room, the time used to test each bulb, the type of bulb, the power supply, the wires and the meters used to calculate the voltage and the wavelengths. These are all controlled variables because all of them remained constant throughout the entire experiment. Uncertainty : In this experiment, the uncertainty and error stem from the fact that the smallest glimmer of light may be recognizable to some and unrecognizable to others. The “first glimmer” of light produced could be placed at one point voltage and another at a different time. The data is based on perception which automatically comes with an obvious uncertainty and allotted error. The error for the wave length would have derived from the fact that the wavelength was shifting all the time and the wavelength recorded was the highest wavelength taken by the meter. The error bars shown in the graphs allow the points to be correct even if the specific readings were incorrect. The error bars do not count for a large percentage of the data we took, but they are reasonable enough to verify the hypothesis. Graph and Table : Voltage Voltage Uncertainty Wavelength Wavelength Uncertainty Blue 2.563 V ±0.06 V 433.25 nm ±3.75 nm Red 1.39 V ±0.02 V 642 nm ±6.97 nm Green 1.706 V ±0.01 V 578 nm ±4.05 nm Yellow 1.616 V ±0.013 V 594.91 nm ±4.93 nm Orange 1.463 V ±0.009 V 618 nm ±4.93 nm UV 2.651 V ±0.016 V 407 nm ±3.75 nm
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Voltage to Wavelength 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 Voltage (V) Wavelength (nm) Conclusion : Based on the evidence in the data and the graph, the hypothesis is correct. When voltage is increased the length of the waves decreases. All of the points touch the
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LED Light Lab - Emilia Wilson November 14, 2008 Chemistry A...

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