+Olfaction - BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Lecture...

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BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Alan J. Hunt Lecture #24: Olfaction Olfaction, or smell, is the process by which environmental chemicals are detected. In some cases these chemicals are specifically released by one organism in order to communicate with another; such chemicals are called pheromones. - Humans can detect ~10,000 different smells ( odorants ). - Only a few tastes can be discriminated, less than 10. These include: sour, salty, sweet, bitter, umami (savory: certain aa’s, glutamate, aspartate & related, possibly MSG), and possibly fat. - Some animals (dogs) may have >100,000 discriminations. Fish have only ~1000. Olfactory Epithelium: - located in posterior of nose - millions of olfactory neurons - one end in the air, one in the brain
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BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Alan J. Hunt - Can be replaced by differentiation of neuronal stem cells. This is unusual for neurons. - Odorant molecules bind to olfactory cilia. This induces depolarization of the nerve, if depolarization is sufficient an action potential is launched down the axon. Receptors on olfactory cilia:
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2009 for the course BIOMEDE 418 taught by Professor Hunt during the Winter '08 term at University of Michigan.

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+Olfaction - BME 418, Quantitative Cell Biology Lecture...

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