Cognitiveaffective model of moral motivation and behavior

Cognitiveaffective model of moral motivation and behavior -...

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A Cognitive-Affective Model of Moral Motivation and Behavior: Identifying Mechanisms of Change June Tangney George Mason University
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Overview Shame and Guilt: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Initial Applications to a Big Problem: Offender Rehabilitation: The GMU Inmate Study The Big Picture: A Cognitive-Affective Model of Moral Motivation and Behavior
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Shame and guilt are moral emotions - presumed to inhibit illegal, immoral, interpersonally harmful behavior
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Shame , Guilt , Embarrassment, Pride Self-conscious Emotions Self Self Evaluates June Tangney -- George Mason University
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What’s the difference between shame and guilt?
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Shame is regret. Guilt is sin-regret. Shame is a feeling that you have when your not happy of your individual outcome or a certain matter. Guilt is when you’ve done something you felt you shouldn’t have. Shame is feeling guilty. Guilt is feeling ashamed about something.
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The #1 ANSWER: You feel shame when other people know what you did. You feel guilt when only you know.
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. % 818 . % 896 . % 978 % 0 % 10 % 20 % 30 % 40 % 50 % 60 % 70 % 80 % 90 % 100 Shame Guilt Embarrassment Percent of Shame, Guilt, and Embarrassment Experiences Known to Others June Tangney -- George Mason University
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Phenomenological Differences Between Shame And Guilt SHAME GUILT Adapted from Lewis (1971) and Lindsay-Hartz (1984) Moderately painful Little shift in self-perception Extremely painful Considerable shift in self-perception “How could I have done that?” Sense of tension, remorse “How could I have done that?” Sense of shrinking, being exposed Feel badly about something we’ve done No impairment, paralysis of self Feel badly about ourselves Self is impaired, paralyzed Motivation to take reparative action Focus on specific behavior Focus on entire self Motivation to hide June Tangney -- George Mason University
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Focus in Shame and Guilt Experiences Shame Guilt Others’ evaluation of self Effect on other Others’ evaluation of self Effect on other Self Self Other Other June Tangney -- George Mason University
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Shame and Guilt are Not Equally “Moral” Emotions 1. Motivations 2. Empathy 3. Anger and Aggression 4. Deterring Immoral Behavior 5. Psychological Symptoms June Tangney -- George Mason University
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Shame and Guilt are Not Equally “Moral” Emotions Hiding vs. Amending Shame attempts to deny, hide or escape the shame situation Guilt to reparative action – confessing, apologizing, undoing. June Tangney -- George Mason University
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Shame and Guilt are Not Equally “Moral Emotions” Other-oriented Empathy Guilt and other-oriented empathy go hand-in-hand If anything, shame may interfere with an empathic connection June Tangney -- George Mason University
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not at all maybe very likely unlikely (half& half) likely likely a)It was my friends fault a)We do it all the time and we always make up c) I would feel sorry and feel like I shouldn’t have done it d) I’d probably feel real lousy about myself
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Interpersonal Reactivity Index Perspective Taking Study 1- Adolescents n = 443 -.06 .45 *** Study 2- College Students n = 197 -.13 .37 *** Study 3- College Students n = 251 -.15 * .37 ***
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Cognitiveaffective model of moral motivation and behavior -...

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