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CriminogenicBeliefs - e.g Tombstone Factors GMU Inmate...

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Tombstone Factors e.g. - age at first arrest - number of prior arrests - criminal versatility - history of alcohol or substance abuse Arrest Reincarceration Recidivism GMU Inmate Study Conviction
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GMU Inmate Study Tombstone Factors e.g. - age at first arrest - number of prior arrests - criminal versatility - history of alcohol or substance abuse Driving Record Residential Stability Child Support Credit History Receipt of Unemployment / Welfare Employment History Arrest Reincarceration Recidivism Rehabilitation Conviction Volunteerism Moral Cognitions Moral Reasoning Criminogenic Beliefs Moral Emotions Shame-Proneness Guilt-Proneness Personal Distress Empathy
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Moral Cognitions Moral Reasoning Criminogenic Beliefs
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Criminogenic Beliefs Criminals who persist in a life of crime often hold a distinct set of beliefs that serve to rationalize and perpetuate criminal activity. Cognitive Biases (e.g., You’re not hurt unless you are bleeding) Theoretically amenable to CBT-based intervention
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