Grusky Reader.13-17

Grusky Reader.13-17 - Grusky Reader, 13-17 Weber, 13,...

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Grusky Reader, 13-17 Weber, 13, Class, Status, Party Power: “ realize own will …against the resistance of others …” (114) Pursuit of power – for monetary but also social honor (for power sake) Distribution of social honor through social order Classes Life chances, income, and labor markets Propertied vs. non property Services offered in the market
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Weber Communal action and class interest Rational association – proletariat Class – can have many forms of class action but not necessary to constitute a community Status groups Communal action (class struggle) in antiquity – over debt bondage, price of bread, etc. Often class conflict – between workers and factory owners, those who are on the front stage; but profits flow to those on the back stage (bankers, stockholders)
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Status groups – as communities (118) Social estimation of honor – style of life Class distinctions linked with status distinctions Stratification of status – through closure and maintenance of life style Status distinctions through rituals Ethnic groups as status groups; caste – extreme form Caste structure more honor in favor of privileged caste and status groups Disdain for physical labor – as a form of status and prestige
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Markets and economic power – do not make social distinctions whereas status stratifies by honor and lifestyle Old money vs. new money takes the next generation to be accepted by privileged status groups Status groups stratified according to consumption and lifestyle (123) Distribution of honor Classes stratified according to relations to production and acquisition of goods Occupational group as status groups
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Parties Acquisition of social power Through violence or votes Structures struggling for domination
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Weber, Status Groups and Classes Owning class vs. nonowning Middle classes – those in between Not necessarily class conflict to change society but conflicts over redistribution of wealth Skilled, semi-skilled, unskilled Working class, petty bourgeoisie, intelligentsia Monopolization of property, skills, etc.
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Status and status groups Plurality of individuals who…enjoy a particular kind and level of prestige by virtue of their position and possibly also claim certain special monopolies ” (127) Style of life (through occupation) Prestige by birth Monopoly by socially distinct groups Can lead to appropriation of governing powers and economic advantages
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Open vs. closed social relationships Open access to outsiders vs. closed Closed relationship when motivation is to maintain position and interest by monopolistic tactics (129) Market relationships essentially open Most communal and associative relationships from one of expansion to exclusiveness (129)
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2009 for the course SOCI 355 taught by Professor Dae during the Spring '09 term at George Mason.

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Grusky Reader.13-17 - Grusky Reader, 13-17 Weber, 13,...

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