lecture05spring2009

lecture05spring2009 - Astronomy 100 - Dr. Rhodes Lecture #5...

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Unformatted text preview: Astronomy 100 - Dr. Rhodes Lecture #5 - 1/23/2009 Chapter 2: From an Earth-Centered to A Sun-Centered System Nicholas Copernicus and the Heliocentric Model Copernicus had the Moon revolving around the Earth. He had all other celestial objects circling the Sun. Copernicus explained the Suns apparent motion north and south of the equator by having the Earths equator tilted with respect to the planets orbit around the Sun. Copernicus also said that the planets orbits were tilted with respect to the ecliptic plane. QuickTime and a Video Format cvid decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a Video Format cvid decompressor are needed to see this picture. Chapter 2: From an Earth-Centered to A Sun-Centered System Comparing The Two Models 1. Accuracy in Fitting the Data As mentioned earlier, a good model must accurately fit all of the available observational data. Copernicuss model, even though better than Ptolemys, was not accurate enough to account for all of the observed irregularities in the motions of the other planets. Chapter 2: From an Earth-Centered to A Sun-Centered System Comparing The Two Models Because both models were based on the assumption that the planets move at constant speed, Copernicus was forced to add small epicycles of his own to improve his accuracy. Copernicus would not abandon the circle as the preferred planetary orbit because he believed in Platos concept of uniform circular motion and he he felt that the circle had to be the proper shape of the orbits. Chapter 2: From an Earth-Centered to A Sun-Centered System Comparing The Two Models Parallax Recall that Parallax is the apparent shifting of nearby objects with respect to distant ones as the position of the observer changes. Both the Copernican model and the Ptolemaic model held that all of the stars were located at a common distance from the Earth. Chapter 2: From an Earth-Centered to A Sun-Centered System Comparing The Two Models Stellar parallax, the apparent annual shifting of nearby stars with respect to background stars, was first observed in 1838....
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2009 for the course ASTR 100 taught by Professor Rhodes during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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lecture05spring2009 - Astronomy 100 - Dr. Rhodes Lecture #5...

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