lecture17spring2009

Lecture17spring2009 - Astronomy100Dr.Rhodes Lecture Chapter 8 The Terrestrial Planets Mercury x x x peopleonEarthtosee.Becauseitisso ,itcanbeseen

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Astronomy 100 - Dr. Rhodes Lecture # 17 - 2/25/2009
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Chapter 8: The Terrestrial Planets Mercury This is the planet that is the hardest for people on Earth to see . Because it is so close to the Sun in the sky, it can be seen low on the horizon just before sunrise in the east or just after sunset in the west. Mercury exhibits phases as does Venus. Features are hard to discern from Earth because Mercury is small, and when it is near the horizon its light must pass through many layers of atmosphere.
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Chapter 8: The Terrestrial Planets Mercury Mercury via Mariner —Moon Comparison Mariner 10 flew by Mercury in 1974 (and subsequently twice more), returning a total of 4,000 photographs for the three fly-bys. Mercury appears similar to our Moon; both are covered with many impact craters. Mercury’s craters are less prominent; the planet’s surface gravity is twice that of the Moon so loose material will not stack as steeply.
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Chapter 8: The Terrestrial Planets Mercury Ray patterns are also less extensive on Mercury than they are on the Moon because of the higher gravity. Mercury lacks the larger maria seen on the Moon. Because Mercury cooled more slowly than did the Moon, meteorites were able to penetrate its crust over a longer period, which allowed lava to flow out over a longer period and to obliterate the older craters. This resulted in the plains that can be seen between the craters.
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Chapter 8: The Terrestrial Planets Mercury More scarps long cliffs in a line—are found on Mercury than on the Moon. Most are believed to have formed from the shrinking of Mercury’s crust as it cooled A large “bulls-eye” impact crater called Caloris Basin is visible. Mariner
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2009 for the course ASTR 100 taught by Professor Rhodes during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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Lecture17spring2009 - Astronomy100Dr.Rhodes Lecture Chapter 8 The Terrestrial Planets Mercury x x x peopleonEarthtosee.Becauseitisso ,itcanbeseen

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