lecture20spring2009

lecture20spring2009 - Astronomy100Dr.Rhodes...

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Astronomy 100 - Dr. Rhodes Lecture #20 - 3/4/2009
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Chapter 9: The Jovian Planets Jupiter’s Moons Some of Jupiter’s family of 63 moons can be divided into 3 smaller groupings: 1. 8 outer moons which orbit in two groups of four that are traveling in opposite directions, which have eccentric orbits, dark surfaces, and which are probably captured asteroids 2. 4 inner moons which orbit very close to Jupiter and which are probably fragmented moonlets.
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Chapter 9: The Jovian Planets Jupiter’s Moons 3. 4 large satellites orbiting in nearly circular orbits which are known as the Galilean moons in honor of their discoverer. The smallest of these 4 large moons is 5,000 times more massive than is the largest of the remaining Jovian moons.
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Some of Jupiter’s Moons Some of Saturn’s Moons Some of Uranus’s Moons
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Chapter 9: The Jovian Planets Jupiter’s Moon Io Io, the Galilean moon closest to Jupiter, has active volcanic geysers that spew hot sulfur onto the surface. These volcanoes were discovered by a former USC astronomy major, Linda Morabito , at JPL. Io’s heat is produced by tidal forces caused by its eccentric orbit around Jupiter.
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Linda Morabito Showing Her Discovery to Members of The Voyager Science Imaging Team
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Eruption on Io , Astronomy Picture of the Day, June 23, 1997 Credit: J. Spencer (Lowell Obs.), WFPC2, HST, NASA
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Images of Both Hemispheres of Io
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Chapter 9: The Jovian Planets Jupiter’s Moons Io and Europa Io is surrounded by a halo of sodium atoms. Io’s density is about 3.5 gm/cm
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2009 for the course ASTR 100 taught by Professor Rhodes during the Spring '08 term at USC.

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lecture20spring2009 - Astronomy100Dr.Rhodes...

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