lecture 6 - Racial Composition

lecture 6 - Racial Composition - Americas Changing Color...

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September 17, 2008 America’s Changing Color Line
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W.E.B. Du Bois “The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line” The Souls of Black Folk (1903)
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How did we get here? How have racial & ethnic classifications have changed over time? The federal government’s role. What about the future ? White vs Black (Nonwhite) or Black and nonBlack? Balkanization or “melting pot” or “whitening” for some groups? What are consequences of racial diversity? What does Putnam say?
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Race and the Census: Constitutional Issues Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution initially stipulated the importance of race, with regards to TAXATION and POLITICAL REPRESENTATION “Indians not taxed” were not to be represented; Slaves were only to be counted as three-fifths of a person for purposes of representation. Beginning with the first census, in 1790, the federal government began collecting data on race.
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Representation: Who gets counted? Clause 3: Apportionment of Representatives and Taxes Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers , which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative;
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The Early Years . . .
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Enumerator Instructions, 1850
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