Lecture_22___Immigration

Lecture_22___Immigration - Immigration Key Questions How...

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November 19, 2008 Immigration
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Key Questions How has immigration changed over America’s history? Immigrant Policy: How do they enter the U.S.? Assimilation: The need for Census Concepts Nativity status: foreign-born and native-born Country of Origin Ancestry Generation: 1 st , 2 nd , 3+ also 1.25, 1.50, 1.75 Year of entry Citizenship How well do they “assimilate”? Theory & Evidence New immigration policy
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Some Statistics The US admits approximately 900,000 legal immigrants (permanent residents) every year (900,000 is .3% of the US population). The State Department issues 5 million visas authorizing temporary admission to the US. The criteria for admission for permanent residence is much more stringent than for temporary visitors.
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You are not allowed into the country if: You are convicted of a felony. You have a history of drug abuse. You have a infectious disease (syphilis, HIV, tuberculosis). You may become a public charge. These characteristics are also grounds for deportation once you have come in.
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Legal Immigrants include:
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The goals of current immigration policy To reunite families by admitting immigrants who already have family members living in the US To admit workers in occupations with a strong demand for labor To provide a refuge for people who face the risk of political, racial, or religious persecution in their home countries To provide admission to people from a diverse set of countries
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