CH 11_second_half_student_outline_on_MEIOSIS

CH 11_second_half_student_outline_on_MEIOSIS - 0 The...

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The lecture today is  rated… 0
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the good, the bad, and the ugly… It’s deals with… 0
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An octopus does it by passing a sperm packet from male to female. 0
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So does a salamander 0
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Sea anemones do it by releasing huge clouds of eggs and sperm into the water 0
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Grunions (a type of fish) do it by swimming ashore during especially high tides and leaving eggs and sperm in the wet sand 0
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A male anglerfish does it by becoming a permanent part of a female male 0
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A female sea horse does it by depositing eggs in a male’s pouch 0
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And these fish even do it by changing from females into males when there’s a shortage 0
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Meiosis Chapter 11 0
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Evolved to pass on genes to another generation, cheating death and achieving immortality through one’s offspring Asexual reproduction is repeated mitosis of cells in some body part and does not generate new gene combinations 1. Budding: in sponges, anemones and hydra 2. Fission: splitting to form 2 smaller individuals that then regenerate missing parts, in corals, annelids, sea stars, and flatworms. REGENERATION is similar. Reproductive Strategies 0
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newly formed bud Hydra 0
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1. 2. 3. Parthenogenesis: development of unfertilized diploid eggs into new female offspring, bees, insects, fish, amphibians, and reptiles. Reproductive Strategies 0
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fission in flatworm 0
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Regeneration in a sea star 0
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1. 2. 3. Reproductive Strategies 0
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Female aphids born pregnant 0
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Sexual reproduction involves the production of haploid gametes (meiosis) and fertilization producing a diploid offspring. Reproductive Strategies 0
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1. Separate sexes produce eggs and sperm Reproductive Strategies 0
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