ASAM_Stereotypes - WHERE DID THIS TERM COME FROM The...

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WHERE DID THIS TERM COME FROM? The term "Lotus Blossom" was given birth by Machiko Kyo in the Teahouse of the August Moon . In this film, she plays a prude, quiet, submissive young lady. Her character enchants the white captain and he falls in love with her. The entire film is about americanizing an Asian city; and her submissive character represents all the Asian females during that time. This Japanese entertainer began her career as a dancer for Daiei Studios. She has demonstrated her acting ability playing a wide range of roles from traditional Asian wives to sexy prostitutes. Teahouse of the August Moon was Machiko's debut in an English-language film. WHAT DOES THIS TERM MEAN? The Lotus Blossom represents the submissive Asian female. Such characters personify the entirety of the female gender in Asia. It is the their yielding, prudent, and exotic nature which the West looks upon to conquer and own. Characterized by Butterfly in Puccini's opera, this packaged perception extends beyond just women. It is an ideal personality parcel, and whether the part be played by a man (as in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly) or by an actual women, it is the shell, the epidermal representation to which the Western masculinity is attracted. HOW HAS THIS TERM EVOLVED OVER TIME? The "Lotus Blossom" has always been considered to the passive beauties who are obedient and silent. However, it has so evolved as time has evolved. The modernized version of Lotus Blossom has been augmented and meshed together with the idea of silent intelligence. Young girls are taught to be
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