Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law

Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law - S toichiometry and...

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Unformatted text preview: S toichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law Gardner Yost Tyi McCray Lab: O P u rpose: To devise and implement a procedure capable of determining the identity of an u nknown salt by reacting i t with sulfamic acid. Observations: -Barometric pressure of Baker hall: 746 mm/hg -Unknown solid number 5313 -Mass solid + Vial = 18.22g -Mass Vial = 15.285g -Mass solid = 2.935 -Temperature of water in beaker (aka temperature of Nit rogen)= 23C -Note: we ran out of water in our Florence f lask toward the end of the reaction. -Mass of water + beaker = 580.3 g - Mass beaker = 193.146 g - Mass water = 387.154 g Calculations: 387.154g water (1g/ml water) = 387.154 ml water (nit rogen produced) PV=nRT (.981579atm)(.387154L)=n(.08206)(296.15K) n=.015999 mols Nit rogen Because Nit rogen and the unknown salt are in a 1:1 ratio during the reaction, we can dived the grams of the unknown salt by the number of moles to get the molar mass of t he salt, then subtract the weights of N and O. 2.935g/.015999mols = 183.55g/mol 14.01g/mol N + 2(16 g/mol O)=46.01 g/mol 183.55g/mol -46.01 g/mol = 137.54g/mol Barium Balanced Reaction: BaNo2 + H SO3N H 2 BaHSO4 + H 2O + N 2 F inal Conclusion: I have determined that our mystery element was Barium. As a serious source of error and s a note toward the procedure of the experiment, either larger Florence flasks should be used or smaller amounts of the salts should be used because we ran out of water in our flask, something that probably altered our results significantly. This was also a problem for several of the groups around me. ...
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2009 for the course CHEM 2070 taught by Professor Chirik,p during the Fall '05 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law - S toichiometry and...

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