History 2020 Final Exam Study Guide

History 2020 Final Exam Study Guide - 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7....

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Chapter 25 1. Adolf Hitler – National Socialistic dictator of Germany who came to power in 1933. He promised to avenge Germany’s humiliation in the aftermath of World War I and embraced virulent anti- semitism. His aggression in Europe unleashed the Second World War. With Germany facing defeat, he committed suicide on April 30 th , 1945. 2. Neville Chamberlain – British prime-minister who in 1938 pursued a policy of appeasement in response to Hitler’s territorial aggression. In 1938, Chamberlain offered Hitler the Sudetenland in return for leaving the rest of Czechoslovakia unmolested. 3. Munich Conference (1938) – September 1938 agreement when Adolf Hitler accepted British prime minister Neville Chamberlain’s terms of appeasement. Germany would regain control of the German speaking Sudetenland in return for leaving the rest of Czechoslovakia alone. Chamberlain believed he had found a diplomatic route to peace, but Hitler violated the agreement less than a year later when he conquered Czechoslovakia. 4. Pearl Harbor – site of Japan’s surprise attack on the U.S. Pacific fleet on December 7 th , 1941. The attack, which took place on the Hawaiin island of Oahu, disabled 18 ships, killed over 2,400 Americans, and severely handicapped U.S. war capabilities in the Pacific. 5. Spanish Civil War – conflict between fascists rebels led by General Francisco Franco and forces loyal to the democratically elected Republican government. Germany and Italy bolstered Franco’s forces and contributed to his victory over the Republican loyalists, who did not receive reinforcements from European Democracies or the United States, despite expressions of sympathy for their cause. 6. A Philip Randolph – head of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters who in 1941 threatened a mass march of African Americans on Washington D.C., if President Roosevelt did not move to end discrimination in industries receiving defense contracts. In mid-1941, Randolph’s demands prompted Roosevelt to issue Executive Order 8802, which created a Committee on Fair Employment Practices to guard against racial discrimination in employment. 7. March on Washington Movement – led by A Philip Randolph, which in turn created Executive Order 8802, which created a Committee on Fair Employment Practices to guard against racial discrimination in employment. 8. Double V Campaign - "Democracy: Victory at Home, Victory Abroad", the Courier remained patriotic, yet pushed for civil rights for blacks. 9. FDR’s Executive Order 8802 - created a Committee on Fair Employment Practices to guard against racial discrimination in employment. 10. Fair Employment Practices (FEPC) 11. Lend / Lease Act (1940) – legislation proposed by Roosevelt and passed by Congress in March 1941 that enabled Britain to obtain arms from America with a promise to reimburse the United States when the war ended. The act reflected Roosevelt’s desire to assist the British in anyway possible, short of war. 12. Peacetime Conscription Act (1940)
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History 2020 Final Exam Study Guide - 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7....

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