Section 3 notes - SOCI 201-011 Section 3 Guide Part 1...

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SOCI 201-011 Section 3 Guide Part 1 Stratification Please print and bring to class Stratification A structured ranking of entire groups of people that perpetuates unequal economic rewards and power in a society. Social inequality A condition in which members of a society have different amounts of wealth, prestige, or power. Power : The ability to exercise one’s will over others. Prestige: The respect and admiration that an occupation holds in a society.
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Wealth: An inclusive term encompassing all of a person’s material assets, including land and other types of property. Income: Salaries and wages Class: A group of people who have a similar level of wealth and income. Objective method: A technique for measuring social class that assigns individuals to classes on the basis of criteria such as occupation, education, income, and place of residence. Subjective method : Permits individuals to locate themselves within a system of social ranking; Class is viewed as a social rather than a statistical category
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Reputational method: Class membership depends on the evaluation of selected observers; Group of “judges” called upon, who are familiar with a community and all its members, to rate the positions of various individuals within the stratification system Social mobility: Movement of individuals or groups from one position of a society’s stratification system to another. Open versus Closed Stratification Systems Open systems encourage competition and imply that a person’s position is influenced by achieved status. Closed systems such as slavery or caste systems allow little or no possibility of moving up. Social placement is based on ascribed status. Slavery: Legalized inequality transferred from parent to children Castes: Hereditary systems usually religiously dictated and fixed Estates: Associated with feudalism, peasants work land leased to them by nobles
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Vertical mobility: The movement of a person from one social position to another of a different rank. Horizontal mobility: The movement of an individual from one social position to another of the same rank. Intergenerational mobility: Changes in the social position of children relative to their parents. Intragenerational mobility: Changes in a person’s social position within his or her adult life. Life chances: People’s opportunities to provide themselves with material goods, positive living conditions, and favorable life experiences.
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Physician 86 Secretary 46 Lawyer 75 Insurance agent 45 Dentist 74 Bank teller 43 College professor 74 Nurse’s aide 42 Architect 73 Farmer 40 Clergy 69 Correctional officer 40 Pharmacist 68 Receptionist 39 Registered nurse 66 Barber 36 High school teacher 66 Child care worker 35 Accountant 65 Hotel clerk 32 Airline pilot 60 Bus driver 32 Police officer 60 Truck driver 30 Kndgrtn teacher 55 Sales worker 28 Librarian 54 Garbage collector 28 Firefighter 53 Waiter 28 Social worker 52 Bartender 25 Electrician 51 Farm worker
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Section 3 notes - SOCI 201-011 Section 3 Guide Part 1...

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