LGW2ECh8solutions - Communication Networks(2nd Edition...

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Communication Networks (2 nd Edition) Chapter 8 Solutions Solutions to Chapter 8 8.1. The IP header checksum only verifies the integrity of IP header. Discuss the pros and cons of doing the checksum on the header part versus on the entire packet. Solution: Error checking in the header is more important because the packet is routed according to the header information. In addition, the delivery of the data at the destination to the higher layers also requires the header information. Thus error checking of the header protects against misdelivery of the information. Restricting the error checking to the header also simplifies the implementation in the nodes, requires less checksum bits, and prevents unnecessary packet discard. Some higher layers can tolerate some data errors, and higher layers also have the option of performing retransmission. 8.2. Identify the address class of the following IP addresses: 200.58.20.165; 128.167.23.20; 16.196.128.50; 50.156.10.10; 250.10.24.96. Solution: An IP address has a fixed length of 32 bits, where the most significant bits identify the particular class. Therefore, to identify the address class we need to convert the dotted-decimal notation back into its binary counterpart, and compare the binary notation to the class prefixes shown in Figure 8.5 in the text. (Recall that the dotted-decimal notation was devised to communicate addresses more readily to other people. In this notation, the 32 bits are divided into four groups of 8 bits – separated by periods – and then converted to their decimal counterpart.) The first few bits (shown in red) of the address can be used to determine the class. 2 7 2 6 2 5 2 4 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 0 128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1 200.58.20.165 110 01000.00111010.00010100.10100101 Class C 128.167.23.20 10 000000.10100111.00010111.00010100 Class B 16.196.128.50 0 0010000.11000100.10000000.00110010 Class A 150.156.10.10 10 010110.10011100.00001010.00001010 Class B 250.10.24.96 1111 1010.00001010.00011000.01100000 Class E Leon-Garcia/Widjaja 1
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Communication Networks (2 nd Edition) Chapter 8 Solutions 8.3. Convert the IP addresses in Problem 8.2 to their binary representation. Solution: 2 7 2 6 2 5 2 4 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 0 128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1 200.58.20.165 11001000.00111010.00010100.10100101 128.167.23.20 10000000.10100111.00010111.00010100 16.196.128.50 00010000.11000100.10000000.00110010 150.156.10.10 10010110.10011100.00001010.00001010 250.10.24.96 11111010.00001010.00011000.01100000 8.4. Identify the range of IPv4 addresses spanned by Class A, Class B, and Class C. Solution: The range of IPv4 addresses spanned by each class is: Class A: 1.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 Class B: 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.255.255 Class C: 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.255 8.5. What are all the possible subnet masks for the Class C address space? List all the subnet masks in dotted- decimal notation, and determine the number of hosts per subnet supported for each subnet mask. Solution: 255.255.255.128 supports 126 hosts (not including the broadcast address) 255.255.255.192 supports 62 hosts 255.255.255.224 supports 30 hosts 255.255.255.240 supports 14 hosts 255.255.255.248 supports 7 hosts 255.255.255.252 supports 3 hosts 255.255.255.254 and 255.255.255.255 are not practically usable. Leon-Garcia/Widjaja 2
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Communication Networks (2 nd Edition) Chapter 8 Solutions 8.6. A host in an organization has an IP address 150.32.64.34 and a subnet mask 255.255.240.0. What is the address of this subnet? What is the range of IP addresses that a host can have on this subnet?
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  • Spring '09
  • BLACK
  • IP address, Transmission Control Protocol, communication networks, Ack=147142999 Win=65535 Len=1460

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