[Euthanasia] Active_and_Passive_Euthanasia

[Euthanasia] Active_and_Passive_Euthanasia - Active and...

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“Active and Passive Euthanasia” James Rachels
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Rachels’ Article This article is about euthanasia. Euthanasia is the practice of bringing about or allowing death in order to allow the patient to escape suffering. There are multiple types of euthanasia. One of the main distinctions is between active and passive euthanasia. In active euthanasia a doctor does something (administers a lethal drug, etc.) that causes the person’s death. The doctor essentially kills the patient. “Mercy killing.” In passive euthanasia a patient is “allowed to die” when the doctor withdraws or does not start some treatment that could prolong the patient’s life. Here, the patient’s condition is the cause of her death. This is the traditional way of defining active and passive euthanasia. Rachels has a problem
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Active and Passive Euthanasia Rachels wants to maintain that there is no morally relevant difference between active and passive euthanasia and no reason that active euthanasia should be forbidden in all cases. He argues this position in four ways: 1. Often, active euthanasia is more humane than passive euthanasia 2. The conventional distinction between active and passive euthanasia leads to mortal decisions being made on irrelevant grounds. 3. The killing and letting die distinction (upon which the active and passive euthanasia distinction rests) is of no moral importance 4. The most common arguments in favor of the conventional view (the opposite of what Rachels is arguing) are mistaken.
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