RNR test 4

RNR test 4 - Barrier beaches and barrier islands important...

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Aquatic Systems: 71% of the Earth’s surface is water, 69% salt water The oceans distribute heat, feed the hydrologic cycle and are critical to the world’s biogeochemical cycles About 250,000 species of plants and animals (that number can be quite low compared to what’s actually out there) Other resources (oil and other stuffs) Coastal zone – high tide mark the edge of the continental shelf Less than 10% area > 90% of all plant and animal species, fisheries Coastal wetlands occur in many shallow areas – more later Estuaries have reduced salinity and high nutrient levels Productive nurseries, access route for anadromous species o Anadromous species – live in salt water, breed in fresh water
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Unformatted text preview: Barrier beaches and barrier islands important o Very fragile systems o Maybe some vegetation on it Marine Ecosystems o Some costal zones support coral reefs Like the rainforest of the ocean o Incredibly bio diverse Open ocean o Oceanic habitats differ primarily in salinity, light levels, nutrient concentrations, and depth o Oceanic o Euphotic o Compensation depth Producing the same amount of oxygen as being used o Bathyl Using more oxygen than is being produce Counts on currents to bring in oxygen o Abyssal Essentially no light And very cold Lots of things live down here Not very dense Upwelling o Incredibly productive o...
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RNR test 4 - Barrier beaches and barrier islands important...

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