Impulse and Momentum

Impulse and Momentum - Impulse and Momentum Victor Liou...

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Impulse and Momentum Victor Liou Partner: Brian Kelly Impulse and Momentum Abstract: In this experiment, we wanted to test how different materials would reduce the the force of a collision when an object has a certain momentum. In part one, we show that impulse, which is the area under a force/time curve is equal to the change in momentum. The data program shows that impulse, = = - I ∆p mvafter = ( + ) mvbefore m vafter vbefore . We found that the error ranges of impulse and momentum overlap. Our impulse had a standard deviation of 0.05014Ns and momentum, 0.01755kgm/s. In part two, we show again that impulse and momentum have the magnitude in an inelastic equation. The values of impulse and momentum only had a 3% difference. Finally, the last part of the experiment showed that, impulse followed the equation = = ( - ) I t0tFdt F t t0 . By lengthening the time of impact, we are able to reduce the force of impact at a given momentum. For the tight rubber band, our force was 5.36 N with a time span of .078s and the loose rubber band had a force of 3.04 N with a time span of 0.13s. Theory: In a scenario of a car collision, it is impossible to be able to tell the type of injury a person will sustain after the car collides. The injuries vary with the type of automobile, its orientation, and the position/configuration of the occupant inside the car. As well, the severity of the injury depends upon the size of the force the occupant receives which is a directly result of impulse ad momentum. When two objects collide as in a person inside a car during collision, they will exert forces on one another. According to Newton’s 3 rd law, the magnitudes of the forces are equal but they are in opposite directions. One the opposing forces may cause the other object to stop, slow down, or change directions. The result depends upon the size of the force and the length of time the force is applied. The product of the force and the time the force is applied
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Impulse and Momentum - Impulse and Momentum Victor Liou...

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