Notes - Political Science 127 Lecture 3: 1. Explaining AFP...

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 Political Science 127 Lecture 3: 1. Explaining AFP Political Econ Psych Social Ideol. 3 rd  image Neo- realism Neo- Marxism 2 nd  image Classical  realism Neo-liberal Marxism Conspiracy  theories Constructivis t Elitist  theory 1 st  image Bio- politics a. Create/adopt a framework for understand AFP b. Make sure it includes at least TWO variables c. Make sure that it is logically consistent and apply it  religiously(avoid cognitive dissonance) d. Grand Strategy i. Posen and Ross (+2 from Rauchhaus) 1. Isolationism(Paleo-conservatism) 2. Neo-isolationism(defensive Realism) a. Don’t go out and provoke or involve. Only interact in  international system when its defense of the country 3. Selective engagement( Realpolitik) a. Being selective; be isolationist when want, cooperative  when it works etc. .
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4. Cooperative security (neo-liberalism) a. Working together as an international system. Used mostly  from WW2 to present 5. Primacy(Neo-conservatism?) a. Dominance, shaping the international system. Dominant to  the point that no one will challenge you. Since WW2 have  been elevated to this position 6. American empire a. Not about being hegemony. About going out and trying to  control the world. Being imperialist.  2. What is imperialism? a. Conquering countries for economic resources and for strategic  positions. Not always conquering, it’s about controlling and  dominating. Display dominate influence. Good and bad  imperialism?? Also spreading religion, but is it for social control or  to actually “save souls”? Imperialist or influence? (one has a  negative connotation) Need a framework. What does it look like?  How does it act? What is the ultimate definition? There isn’t really  one. Can mean actively trying to control another country through  violence, the threat of violence or through strong physical control  over another one. The defining factor is physically controlling  outcomes through force or threats.  b. The policy, practice or advocacy of extending the power and  dominion of a nation especially by direct territorial acquisitions or  by gaining indirect control over the political or economic life of  other areas c. Types of imperialism i. Religious
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ii. Political iii. Economic  iv. Others? d. Is the US imperialist? i. Empirical record 1. 1800-1914, continental expansion, Monroe Doctrine 2. 1919-1942, Isolationism? 3. 1942-1991, Cold War/NATO/Third World 4. 1991-2001, Post-Cold War, NATO expansion, Kosovo 5. 2001-Present, Post 9/11, Afghanistan and Iraq e. James Field i. Arguments about US imperialism tend to be rather weak ii. The same argument keeps getting retreaded 1. The Founding Fathers, the North, the Spanish-American war,  Vietnam, Iraq
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This note was uploaded on 03/12/2009 for the course POLY SCI 127 taught by Professor Staff during the Winter '08 term at UCSB.

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Notes - Political Science 127 Lecture 3: 1. Explaining AFP...

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