Chapter 2

Chapter 2 - c. Substitution i. Anaphoric element- elements...

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Ch. 2 Diagnosis for Syntactic Structure 1. Diagnosis for Structure a. Structure and Meaning i. Language unites form and interpretation ii. Sentences are constructed of units made up of words, which are known as constituents 1. Defined with [square brackets] b. Intuitions about Structure i. Hypotheses about constituents containing a verb sequence: 1. [[The doctor] [will prescribe] [a medicine] [after the test]] 2. [[The doctor] [will] [prescribe [a medicine]] [after the test]] ii. Tree diagrams demonstrating the two hypotheses: 1. Diag 2. Diag iii. Immediate constituent- more readily available to the base sentence iv. Ultimate constituent- less readily available to the base sentence
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Unformatted text preview: c. Substitution i. Anaphoric element- elements that can be used to replace strings of words in a sentence (ex: pronoun) 1. The doctor will prescribe a medicine after the test 2. He will prescribe it then 3. He will do so then ii. Substitution obeys constituency iii. Revised hypothesis: 1. Diag iv. Noun phrase- a constituent whose most important element is a noun (NP) v. Verb phrase- a constituent whose most important element is a verb (VP) vi. Prepositional phrase- a NP with a preposition before it vii. Head- the core element of the constituent...
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course SPAN 112 taught by Professor Georgehirons during the Spring '08 term at Tulane.

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