Tulane - PHIL - 301 - Section 01 - Philosophy of Religion - Spring - 2008 - Paper Topics 02

Tulane - PHIL - 301 - Section 01 - Philosophy of Religion - Spring - 2008 - Paper Topics 02

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PHIL 301 – Philosophy of Religion Spring, 2008 Paper Topics 02 The paper is due on Thursday, April 10 th . Your paper should address one of the following questions. The papers should be from 4-6 pages long (1200-1800 words). Please double-space and make use of a normal size font (e.g., 12 pt., Times New Roman). Do not handwrite. Also, remember that in these papers you will be asked to take up and defend a particular position. You must offer arguments on behalf of that position; you must offer reasons that you would expect others to be convinced by. Please be sure to defend your answers. 1. In his essay, “The Evidential Argument from Evil”, William Rowe argues that the existence of apparently gratuitous evil can be used to justify, or make reasonable, the belief that there is no God. After offering his argument, Rowe considers possible responses on behalf of the theist. Rowe believes that a certain indirect kind of response, which he dubs the G. E. Moore shift, is the best and most satisfying response the theist can give to the Evidential Argument from Evil. Is Rowe right about this? Explain Rowe’s Evidential Argument from Evil. Explain the indirect response to this argument
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course PHIL 301 taught by Professor Kane during the Spring '08 term at Tulane.

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Tulane - PHIL - 301 - Section 01 - Philosophy of Religion - Spring - 2008 - Paper Topics 02

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