Angiosperms

Angiosperms - Angiosperms These lecture notes only give a...

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Angiosperms These lecture notes only give a basic outline of the lecture. They also include some information that I mentioned in lecture that is not in the powerpoint presentation. Be sure to carefully look through the powerpoint file! Angiosperms are the largest group of plants, with over 250,000 species. They evolved in the early Cretaceous, at least 130 million years ago. I. Review of plant phylogeny, with key innovations characterizing each group. Algae and all land plants have chlorophyll a and b. All land plants have cuticle, stomata, and an embryophyte. All vascular plants have vascular tissue, gymnosperms and angiosperms both have seeds and pollen, and angiosperms have flowers. II. Angiosperms (encased seed, named due to ovary enclosed in a carpel: the most important group of plants, dominate the world’s vegetation) Key innovations of angiosperms, focusing on adaptations to life on land: flowers, animal (as well as wind and other types of) pollination, fruits, double fertilization, continued reduction of the gametophyte, vessels III. Trends in the evolution of angiosperms Monocots vs. dicots: The monocots are a monophyletic group, while the dicots consist of two separate lineages. The dicots are paraphyletic. Trend towards reduction of flower parts, trend toward fewer floral whorls, shortening of
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Angiosperms - Angiosperms These lecture notes only give a...

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