TWS 21 A01 Student-Generated Final Exam Study Guide

TWS 21 A01 Student-Generated Final Exam Study Guide - TWS...

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TWS 21 Section A01 Student-Generated Final Exam Study Guide Sundiata by D.T. Niane Characters: Griot (Balle Faseke) Sundiata’s Mother (Sogolon Kedjou) Sundiata’s Father (Maghan Konfatta) Sundiata’s Sisters (Sogolon Konkolan/ Sogolon Djamarou) Sundiata’s enemy (Sumouro Kante) Sundiata’s Mother’s Rival ( ) Themes: Orality vs. Literacy Importance of a Griot The use of the “Talking Drum” (i.e.: variable pitch drum and slit drum) Familiar Lineages Destiny Notion of Hero Supernatural Beliefs Parallel to Christian Theology of Jesus Language Interplay of Islamic Beliefs with African tradition Comparable of Greek literature “Odyssey” Similar in epics: “3 Rites of Passage” >Separation, Initiation, Return Relation to other novels: The Palm-Wine Drinkard Matigari A Dance of the Forests God Dies by the Nile Types of Oral Tradition 1) Poetry: Panageric- “praise poetry” address to king, accompanied by instrument Elegaic- “praise poetry for life of someone who is dying; uses allusion,metaphors to praise Religious- “praise to God” Lyric- relaxation, sung with drinks in parties, informal 2) Proverb 3) Riddle 4) Storytelling
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The Palm-Wine Drinkard by Amos Tutuola - Historical Context: o written in a time where educated blacks didn’t like it because it didn’t cater to those who were educated - Important Characters: o Main Character (palmwine drinkard) o His wife - General information: o story-telling epic o unifying elements journey / quest story has tasks / goals that he has to accomplish Images of death and rebirth Represented through personification Wife’s growing power evolution of role of women Fire as purgative destructive and constructive at the same time o Diction: exaggeration often used - Symbols and themes: o Personification Drum dance and song Images of death and rebirth o Journey is more important the arrival Symbolism of egg changing from creating palm-wine to whips o Wisdom Gained at the end of the journey o Religious themes Yoruba : Christianity Cries out to God for help He calls himself father of gods Supernatural influence – land of the dead; crazy half children “juju” – magic
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Negritude Poetry 1) New York” by Léopold Sédar Senghor The first two parts of this poem offer contrasts between the modern city of New York and African American’s home country. The modern city is cold, robotic and seemingly uncaring; while African Americans offer spirit and a more down to earth, human element in areas of the city like Harlem. Then in the third part of the poem Senghor offers a model of synthesis between the two worlds, a unity between black and white cultures. 2) “The Vultures” by David Diop
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TWS 21 A01 Student-Generated Final Exam Study Guide - TWS...

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