Presentation5 - King of Ithaca The craftiest and wiliest of...

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Homer’s Iliad : An Introduction
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Homer Name given to the author of the Iliad and Odyssey According to tradition, a blind bard from the island of Chios The evidence suggests that the Iliad and Odyssey were composed in the Greek settlements of Asia Minor Date of composition of the poems: 8th century BCE
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The “Homeric Question” By whom and how were the so-called Homeric poems composed?
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A very brief look at Homeric scholarship Antiquity: scholia (commentaries), Peisistratus’s edition of the poem (6th century BCE), and Alexandrinian scholarship (3rd-2nd century BCE) Analysts vs. Unitarians Oral tradition Milman Parry and Albert Lord Epic poem: meter = dactylic exameter
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The Cast of Characters Greeks and Trojans
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Agamemnon “Lord of Men” The most powerful among the Greeks Not the best warrior
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Menelaus King of Sparta Husband of Helen Single combat with Paris: Paris is rescued by Aphrodite
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Achilles Prince of the Myrmidons Son of Peleus and the goddess Thetis The best warrior Invulnerable except for his heel
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Nestor King of Pylos The oldest and wisest of the Achaeans
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Odysseus
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Unformatted text preview: King of Ithaca The craftiest and wiliest of all Achaeans Ajax the Greater Son of Telamon Second only to Achilles in fighting Colossal stature His madness Ajax the Lesser Son of king Oileus He raped Cassandra during the sack of Troy Diomedes King of Argos A great warrior A favorite of Athena Together with Odysseus, he stole the Palladium from Troy, thus securing its fall Priam King of Troy He had 50 sons and 50 (or 12) daughters 19 of his children were by his second wife Hecuba Hector Son of Priam The most honorable of the Trojan Husband of Andromache Father of Astyanax Paris Son of Priam and Hecuba He seduced Helen and brought her back to Troy Cassandra The most important of Priam’s daughters Loved by Apollo, who endowed her with the gift of prophecy She died at Mycenae at the hand of Clytemnestra Aeneas Son of Anchises and Aphrodite He fought with Achilles and was rescued by Poseidon He escaped from Troy (see Vergil’s Aeneid )...
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Presentation5 - King of Ithaca The craftiest and wiliest of...

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