Lecture Notes - CH13

Lecture Notes - CH13 - CHAPTER 13 The Realist Road to...

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CHAPTER 13 The Realist Road to Security Through Alliances, Arms Control, and the Balance of Power Chapter Outline I. The Impact of Alliances on National and Global Security A. Controversy: Do the Advantages of Alliances Outweigh the Disadvantages? B. Realpolitik Assumptions of Balance-of-Power Theory 1. Rules for Rivals in the Balancing Process 2. Difficulties with Balance of Power Systems C. Managing the Balance through a Concert of Great Powers II. Stabilizing Power Balances Through Arms Control A. Arms Control versus Disarmament B. Bilateral Arms Control and Disarmament C. Multilateral Arms Control and Disarmament D. The Problematic Future of Arms Control and Disarmament III. Balancing Power in the Contemporary Global System A. Models of the Balance of Power in the Twenty-First Century 1. Unipolarity – the United States 2. Bipolarity – the United States and Russia B. World Domination by the U.S. Superpower, or a Multipolar Future of Balance-of- Power Competition? C. Controversy: Is a Unipolar, Bipolar, or Multipolar System the Most Stable? Chapter Summary I. The Impact of Alliances on National and Global Security Most states view their security options from a narrow realist perspective that includes arming themselves, forming alliances, or negotiating arms control. Alliances usually form when two or more states face a common security threat, however they can bind a state to a commitment that may later become disadvantageous. Alliances have five fundamental flaws: They enable aggressive states to combine their capabilities. They provoke the formation of counteralliances, which reduces security. They may draw otherwise neutral parties into disputes. States must control the behavior of their own allies. Today’s ally might be tomorrow’s enemy. Wilson proposed collective security as an alternative to alliances. A. Controversy: Do the Advantages of Alliances Outweigh the Disadvantages? The advantages of alliances include: Aggregating military capabilities Reducing the cost of military preparations Furnishing a medium for exerting leverage to mobilize or restrain a partner, neutralize those who might otherwise interfere with some foreign policy 1
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World Politics: Trend and Transformation undertaking, or preempt an adversary by bonding with a strategically important country Helping acquire benefits a state could not obtain acting unilaterally The disadvantages of alliances include: Might bind a state to an open-ended commitment that might later cease to be in the state’s interest Usefulness erodes as the threat that brought the allies together declines Might entangle a state in disputes it could otherwise avoid Can provoke the fears of adversaries, thereby perpetuating ongoing rivalries May stimulate envy and resentment by friends who are outside the alliance B. Realpolitik Assumptions of Balance-of-Power Theory
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course INST 102 taught by Professor Lebamoff during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Chicago.

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Lecture Notes - CH13 - CHAPTER 13 The Realist Road to...

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