Lecture Notes - CH11

Lecture Notes - CH11 - CHAPTER 11 The Transformation of...

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CHAPTER 11 The Transformation of Armed Conflict Chapter Outline I. Continuities and Change in Armed Conflict II. Rival Theories of the Causes of Aggression A. The First Level of Analysis: Individuals’ Human Nature B. The Second Level of Analysis: States’ Internal Characteristics 1. Duration of Independence 2. Cultural Determinants, Feminist Theory, and the Decay of Moral Constraints 3. Poverty 4. The New Geography of Conflict 5. Militarization 6. Economic System 7. Type of Government 8. Nationalism C. The Third Level of Analysis: Cycles of War and Peace in the Global System 1. Does Violence Breed Violence? 2. Power Transitions 3. Cyclical Theories D. Controversy: Does Nationalistic Love of Country Cause War with Foreign Nations? III. Armed Conflict Within States A. The Characteristics of Civil War B. The Causes of Civil War 1. Relative Deprivation 2. Demographic Stress 3. Secessionist Revolts 4. Nationalistic Ethnic Hatred 5. Failed States 6. Economic Roots C. The International Dimensions of Internal War IV. Terrorism A. The New Global Terrorism B. Counterterrorism C. Controversy: Can the War Against Global Terrorism Be Won? Chapter Summary I. Continuities and Change in Armed Conflict The general trends in warfare show that the proportion of countries engaged in wars has declined, most wars are now in the Global South, wars to conquer territory no longer exist, and wars between the great powers are becoming obsolete. 1
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World Politics: Trend and Transformation II. Rival Theories of the Causes of Aggression The most commonly cited causes of war can be found at the three levels of analysis. A. The First Level of Analysis: Individuals’ Human Nature Some psychologists have concluded that aggression is an instinctive part of human nature that stems from humans’ genetic programming and psychological makeup. However, most social scientists disagree with the premise that humans fight wars because of innate genetic drives. Many examples exist of peaceful societies, so, while humans have the capacity for violence, they do not possess an instinct for war. Aggression is a characteristic acquired through socialization. However, individuals’ willingness to die in war remains a mystery. The territorial imperative of humans has been advanced as another cause of war. Others note that the national character of certain nationalities drives them to aggression, although one cannot make accurate predictions of behavior based on stereotypes. B. The Second Level of Analysis: States’ Internal Characteristics The assumption of this level of analysis is that differences in the types of classes of states will determine whether they will engage in war. 1. Duration of Independence New states are the most likely to experience civil wars and engage in foreign wars because they typically go through an initial period of political unrest. 2.
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course INST 102 taught by Professor Lebamoff during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Chicago.

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Lecture Notes - CH11 - CHAPTER 11 The Transformation of...

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