Lecture Notes - CH10

Lecture Notes - CH10 - CHAPTER 10 Population and Resource...

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CHAPTER 10 Population and Resource Pressures on the Global Environment Chapter Outline I. Population Change as a Global Political Challenge A. Understanding Growth Rates: The Persian Chessboard B. The Demographic Divide between the Global North and Global South C. Population Momentum D. From Population Explosion to Population Implosion – A Demographic Transition? E. New Plagues? The Global Impact of Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS II. International Responses to Population Growth A. Food Fights: The Clash of Optimists and Pessimists B. Controversy: How Many People Can the Earth Support? C. A Prescription for Optimism or Pessimism? III. Environmental Security and Sustainable Development IV. The Ecopolitics of Energy A. The Global Politics of Oil Supply and Consumption B. Running on Empty: Is Energy Security an Elusive Goal? V. The Ecopolitics of the Atmosphere A. Climate Change B. Climate-Change Culprits C. Ozone Protection VI. The Ecopolitics of Forests and Biodiversity A. Shrinking Forests and Dust Bowls B. Biodiversity VII. Toward Preservation: The International Response A. Trade, the Environment, and Sustainable Development VIII.Toward Sustainability? Chapter Summary I. Population Change as a Global Political Challenge The metaphor of the tragedy of the commons explains how individuals acting in their own best interest can have a destructive collective impact. Population growth is one example of this phenomenon. However, population growth has declined in recent years, although the total number of people being added is significant. A. Understanding Growth Rates: The Persian Chessboard The analogy of the Persian chessboard demonstrates the phenomenal growth that occurs when population increases exponentially. Unfortunately, resources only increase arithmetically. While growth rates have declined in recent years, the absolute number of people being added to the global population has been increasing. 1
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World Politics: Trend and Transformation B. The Demographic Divide between the Global North and Global South The “demographic divide” describes how population growth rates have been much higher in the Global South than in the Global North. While the rates in the North have fallen below replacement-level fertility, they average around 3.1 children per mother in the South. High fertility rates have important economic consequences for the South. C. Population Momentum High birthrates and falling death rates explain the population surge in the South. However, population momentum means the rate will continue to grow for many years, even with policies designed to slow it down. At the same time, some countries in Europe are experiencing negative population growth. These trends mean the population divide will continue to grow.
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course INST 102 taught by Professor Lebamoff during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Chicago.

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Lecture Notes - CH10 - CHAPTER 10 Population and Resource...

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