Bandura - Social Cognitive Theory of Mass Communication...

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Social Cognitive Theory of Mass Communication Albert Bandura Photo source: Pajares, F. (2004). Albert Bandura: Biographical sketch. http://des.emory.edu/mfp/bandurabio.html
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Classic Research Studies Street crossing at red light, more likely following well-dressed model Kids imitate assault on Bobo doll, more likely if adult model is rewarded
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Concern lingers over copycat crimes “Now, experts fear, other vulnerable, angry boys may try to copy or surpass Cho’s massacre. As of Friday, the FBI counted 35-40 school-based threats, with everything from bombs to guns to mere words, some leading to arrests.” “While it’s possible the coverage … could prompt copycats, the coverage could also prompt other individuals to back away from some sort of violence.”
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What causes people to imitate behavior they observe in the media? Violence (TV, video games, song lyrics, etc.) Advertising (models, etc.) Language, gestures, clothing styles, etc. Attitudes, moral norms
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2009 for the course COMM 3210 taught by Professor Craig during the Fall '08 term at Colorado.

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Bandura - Social Cognitive Theory of Mass Communication...

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