Book of Duchess critresponse1

Book of Duchess critresponse1 - 11 September 2007 Professor...

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11 September 2007 Professor B.G. Harding ENG 3542-001 Critical Response #1 4. The dreamer and the Man in Black both employ many language and rhetorical strategies in Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess . However, Chaucer provides the Man in Black with a more poetic verse than the dreamer and the Man in Black narration is far superior to the dreamer’s. The dreamer admires the Man in Black’s ability to be rational and reasonable despite his inner turmoil, “And I saw that and gan m’aqueynte; With him, and fond him so tretable, Right wonder skilful and reasonable And me thoughte, for al his bale”(lns.535-537). The Man in Black is assumed to be John of Gaunt and therefore is from a higher strata of society than the dreamer. This hierarchy is further developed in the way that the two address eachother with the uses of the formal “you” and “Thou.” For example, the Man in Black says, “I thank thee that thou woldest so” (ln. 561). The dreamer is also impressed with how well the knight spoke to him, “Lo, how goodly spak
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This essay was uploaded on 03/18/2009 for the course ENGL 3543 taught by Professor Baharding during the Fall '07 term at Colorado.

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Book of Duchess critresponse1 - 11 September 2007 Professor...

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