chaucer_response3!

chaucer_response3! - 11 October 2007 Professor B.G. Harding...

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11 October 2007 Professor B.G. Harding ENG 3542-001 Critical Response #3 A. 1. Troilus is very self-conscious about displaying any affection or inclination towards feelings of love in public. He is weary of lovers and the strong effects love has over an individual. Troilus expresses this disdain in his speech to his other knights, “… she slepeth softe / For love of the whan thow turnest ofte!” (Book 1, lns195-196). He goes on to comment on lover’s foolish devotion and the silliness and blindness of love. Troilus sounds as if his words are elevated in a manner that he feels he is not only the commander of his troops, but of trivial manners of love. He is elevated to the point that he seems to understand and mock the world around him. After the God of Love strikes him with an arrow of love, Troilus is vulnerable to the powers of love and “Therwith his herte gan to sprede and rise / And softe sighed, lest men myghte hym here” (Book 1, lns 278-279). Troilus lets out a soft sigh so his men would not hear him and know he has
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chaucer_response3! - 11 October 2007 Professor B.G. Harding...

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